In an era where we're inundated with negative headlines, it's no surprise that optimism about the future isn't at an all time high.

We're cynical and jaded. Simply put, it's easy to forget that there's still some good out there.

But, as we learned from one recent heart-warming story, It turns out there's even some good in MIDDLE SCHOOLERS... And we'd completely written them off as hormonal little sociopaths. 

Think again!


At the beginning of her son Dylan's school year, volleyball coach Josette Duran uploaded the following picture to Facebook: 

"Dylan explained there was a boy who sits by himself and eats only a fruit cup," the mom from Albuquerque, New Mexico, told Us Magazine. "He said he didn’t think the friend had enough money to buy lunch."

After that conversation, 14-year-old Dylan brought two lunches to school each day. "It just became normal," Duran said. 

Later, Duran learned the child's mother had lost her job and struggled to pay for lunches — a problem Duran herself understands. It was only a few years ago that she and Dylan were homeless and struggling to eat. 

"We were living out of my car, hotels and on friends’ couches," she said. She refused to let the boy's mother reimburse her for the lunches. 


This week, Duran and her son are receiving more national attention after she did an interview with local news outlet KCCI. It has since gone viral on Facebook. 

She even worked with the volleyball team she coaches to raise $200 for the school cafeteria to ensure that no child goes hungry during the day. 

"We paid up all the past due accounts for all the kids that need lunch," she said. "So now no one in that school owes any lunch money to anybody and everyone can eat."

The video has been viewed 15 million times and received thousands of comments.... Mostly about how people's faith in humanity is somewhat restored.


Duran, thankful for the outpouring of love and support, posted this video in response. 

And, she's still humbled by the whole thing. Lesson of the day: let's live our lives more like Duran and her son, Dylan. 

Turns out we have a lot to learn from 14-year-olds. (h/t us magazine)