Now don't get me wrong, Vladimir Putin is a pretty terrible person. Whether it's his annexation of Crimea, disgusting treatment of homosexuals, or the fact that he's probably trying to help Donald Trump win the election by hacking Clinton's servers. 

But at the start of this year, Russian newspaper Zvezdi I Soveti (Stars and Advice) released a sexy calendar featuring the president in both sexy and cute poses. It kind of made my year. And the good news? It's back for 2017.

The BBC's Steve Rosenberg took a look at what we can expect this year.

 

January - Putin lighting a candle.

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February - Putin creepily holding a small child. 

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March - Putin holding a kitty cat.

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April - Putin hanging out in a tree.

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May - Putin looking sad.

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June - Putin looking dad-like.

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July - Putin in a wetsuit (my personal favorite).

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August - Putin getting ready to harvest the crops. In a suit, of course. 

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September - Putin looking at a crane while in a plane.

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October - Brokeback Putin.

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November - Putin dressed as a sexy fighter pilot.

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December - Putin and his clock. 

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Of course, there's a special New Year's message. "Russia is a peace loving and self-sufficient country. We don't need other people's territories. We don't need other people's natural resources. But if we are threatened, we are prepared to use weapons to guarantee our security."

But some Twitter users weren't happy that certain photos didn't make it in this year.

 

 

 

Others just want to know where they can get one.


To answer that question, last year the calendar was available from newspaper stands around Moscow. The 200,000 copies quickly flew off shelves at a very reasonable 78 roubles ($1).